Programme 2021

Schelde Maas Ourthe Moezel
08:30 – 08:45 Starting up – Welcome
08:45 – 09:30 Plenair
09:30 – 10:30  Giving and Receiving Feedback isn’t rocket science!

Philippe Vandessel
&
Geneviève Loriaux

 The well-balanced Product Owner

Robert van Lieshout

Computer
 How to cater for your needs without being the bull in the china shop

Wiro van Schaik
&
Linda van der Pal

Max: 20 

De slides van de sessie

 Ethics for Agile Coaching

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
&
Shane Hastie

10:30 – 10:45 Coffee Break
10:45 – 12:15  Develop a Growth mindset in the Growth Sprint

Johan Decoster

 Test yourself at the TCR workout machine!

Philippe Bourgau
&
damien.menanteau@murex.com

Computer
Max: 40 

Public Repo and slides

 Build-Run-Improve-Repeat

Koen Vastmans
&
Jord Rengerve

Computer
Max: 14 
 Find your Energy

Per Beining

Max: 30 
12:15 – 13:15 Lunch
13:15 – 14:00 Plenair
14:00 – 15:00  How to start up a distributed team online with gamification

Ben Linders

Computer
Max: 16 
 10 things they didn’t tell you about TDD

Gil Zilberfeld

 Agile at scale generative principles, an alternative to scaled frameworks

Luca Minudel
&
Giovanni Asproni

 Colorful birds – that is all you need to build connected people!

Marie Jacqmin
&
Jurgen Maus

Max: 28 
15:00 15:15 Coffee Break
15:15 – 16:15  Happy Imposter

Remi-Armand Collaris
&
Dionne Oomen

Max: 24 
 When working harder does not solve the problem anymore

Jan De Baere

 The journey is more important than the destination

Huib Schoots
&
Martijn van de Haterd

 Reinventing the greatest invention of the last 120 years

Heitor Roriz Filho

Max: 900 
16:15 – 16:45  Learning to run it

Nelis Boucké

 Learn to use technical debt in your benefit

Arjen de Ruiter


I’ll share the github link when we (me and me designer) have published it. I can share it upfront in a Zoom call if you want.

 Living Documentation: Why should I care?

Kaspar van Dam

Max: 100 

n/a

 Switching from Scrum to Kanban? Forget it!

Denis Salnikov

16:45 – 17:00 Plenair
Legend
Technology and Technique
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Giving and Receiving Feedback isn’t rocket science!

Lead by example and learn how to give and receive feedback

Philippe Vandessel
& Geneviève Loriaux

You know what? Feedback is not something awkward. It’s a present! Join our session if you want to foster a culture of team growth based on feedback.
Goal of the session: Discover what powerful feedback can do for you and your team.
Intended audience: everyone
Expected experience: No experience needed
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Feedback is all around us, every day, in every aspect of our lives. You could say we should be well-trained in giving and receiving feedback, especially when working in agile teams were we’re suppose to learn and adapt from feedback. But, no, generatively spoken, we suck at feedback!

Did you ever had a co-worker, team member, friend,… who was annoying the crap out of you and you didn’t know how to give that feedback in a healthy manner? Or are you uncomfortable with telling someone he’s doing a great job? Did you ever think that the receiver of your feedback didn’t get your message and doesn’t take up the massive advise you’re giving?

The common factor is you! Are you man enough to lead by example in personal leadership and learn how to give and receive feedback to people around you?

In this session:

– What is feedback all about? – INTENTION

– What does feedback say about me? – REFLECTION

– How to give feedback? – STRUCTURE

Btw, we love dialogue! This session will be interactive. You will be invited to share and challenge our thoughts and ideas.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Laptop

The well-balanced Product Owner

How to avoid becoming a feature-factory

Robert van Lieshout

Are you a Product Owner struggling to find the balance between stakeholder demands and developer requests? Or a developer trying to convince your P.O. to make some room for Technical Debt?

Let me get you started with a very simple yet effective backlog management technique: backlog quadrants. And as a bonus I’ll show you how to write good product backlog items for each different quadrant (hint: user stories are only good for 1 of those quadrants).

Goal of the session: insights and useful techniques for backlog management
Intended audience: Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Beginner
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
Are you a Product Owner struggling to find the balance between stakeholder demands and developer requests? Or a developer trying to convince your P.O. to make some room for Technical Debt?

Let me get you started with a very simple yet effective backlog management technique: backlog quadrants. And as a bonus I’ll show you how to write good product backlog items for each different quadrant (hint: user stories are only good for 1 of those quadrants).

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
20

How to cater for your needs without being the bull in the china shop

How to discuss matters peacefully under pressure using NVC

Wiro van Schaik
& Linda van der Pal

Do you often feel that you aren’t understood when you’re in a discussion? That the other party just doesn’t get it? Come to this session to learn how to communicate more effectively without stepping on everyone’s toes by using non-violent communication.
Goal of the session: Learn the basic principles of Non-Violent Communication (NVC) and get some hands-on experience
Intended audience: Marieke, Bram, Philippe, George, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen,
Expected experience: We’re all communicators so no additional experience needed
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
Materials: De slides van de sessie
Non-violent communication (also known as “Verbindende Communicatie” in Dutch) is a simple but effective model for communication between team members, stakeholders and people in general. Apart from Agile, Lean and Consent Decision Making, it’s also one of the big inspirations for Sociocracy 3.0, a social technology for effective collaboration at any scale. It is based on the work of American Psychologist Marshall B. Rosenberg and supported by the international Center for Nonviolent Communication (CNVC).

The non-violent communication process contains four elements: Observations, Feelings, Needs and Requests and a fifth element compassion that binds it all together. It’s about what you observe, how that makes you feel or what emotion that triggers with you, your need that may be causing your feeling and the concrete action you would like to request to improve the situation. It’s also about the proper balance between listening and speaking and especially about being able to distinguish these four elements in others so you can look for those actions that improves the situation for all people involved in a conversation.

In a world where we do more and more work in multi-disciplinary teams with often seemingly opposing views and stakes and many unknowns and with increased time pressure to come to results, it’s important to be able to effectively bundle the collective intelligence of any group without unnecessary discussions and arguments.

In this workshop we provide you with the basis understanding of the process of non-violent communication and it’s five elements, let you experience yourself how it works and we hand you several practical exercises that will help you improve your learning in your own situation.

Why should I attend? Because you want more effective conversations with your team members, other colleagues, your boss or client, your spouse or even your children.

What will I learn? The 4 steps of non-violent communication and their common element, how to apply them and how to avoid some common pitfalls.

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Ethics for Agile Coaching

Agile Coaches are expected to act ethically, but what does that mean in practice?

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse
& Shane Hastie

Agile Coaching is an evolving profession and comprehends multiple disciplines. Agile Coaches are expected to act ethically, but what does that mean in practice?

In this session, we will explore the draft of the Code of Ethics for Agile Coaching, as published under the Agile Alliance. This Code intends to provide a single evolving source of ethical guidance for agile coaching across the broad range of constituent disciplines.

We will look at example scenarios to help identify the types of dilemmas agile coaches may face and discuss the appropriateness of ethical behavior in different contexts.

You can read beforehand the proposal of the Code of Ethics on the website of Agile Alliance https://www.agilealliance.org/resources/initiatives/agile-coaching-ethics/

Goal of the session: Learn about the Ethics Code for Agile Coaching
Expected experience: some experience as agile coach
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Agile Coaching is an evolving profession and comprehends multiple disciplines. Agile Coaches are expected to act ethically, but what does that mean in practice?

In this session, we will explore the Code of Ethics for Agile Coaching draft, as published under the Agile Alliance. This Code intends to provide a single evolving source of ethical guidance for agile coaching across the broad range of constituent disciplines.

We will look at example scenarios to help identify the types of dilemmas agile coaches may face and discuss the appropriateness of ethical behavior in different contexts.

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Develop a Growth mindset in the Growth Sprint

Make real progress on your most important improvement goal through developing your mindset.

Johan Decoster

Start creating your own “Immunity to Change” Map – raise your self-awareness about what’s in your way to make progress on what is really important to you in your life right now.

Get a taste of mindset development in action.

Intended audience: all
Expected experience: no
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
If there was ONE thing that you could get better at, and that would make a significant improvement in your work, what would that be?

This is the central question that you work on during the Growth Sprint. An 8-week transformative peer-coaching program where you discover and start overturning your limiting assumptions. People join the program with goals they truly want but haven’t been able to achieve yet. Like: I want to get better at delegating work, I want to get better at saying no to requests, I want to be more focused on what is important, … You know the techniques to do so but something is holding you back? Then this session is for you!

This is your chance to get a taste of how it feels to develop your way of thinking together with peers.

What you will do in this session:

– Understand what adult development theory is about (5′)

– What is the importance of it in change programs and a VUCA world (10′)

– Start building your first Immunity to Change Map – see why you are struggling to achieve your personal goal.(45′-60′)

– Leave the session with a real next steps

This program is based on adult development theory and the Immunity to Change method developed by Harvard psychologists R.Kegan and L.Lahey. GrowthLab21 is the only trained provider of this program in Belgium.

Back to program


max
40

Laptop

Test yourself at the TCR workout machine!

What do you do when a workout becomes too easy? You add weights! But how do you do that with programming katas? Add TCR and start learning incremental design!

Philippe Bourgau
& damien.menanteau@murex.com

What do you do when a workout becomes too easy? You add weights! But how do you do that with programming katas?

How do you teach coding in baby steps to experienced programmers who manage (mostly) to go through our katas in big steps?

TCR (Test && Commit || Revert) is the baby-step workout machine that you can add to your kata sessions!

Join this session, see TCR in action, and start coaching incremental design in your team NOW!

Goal of the session: Discover the benefits of TCR and learn how to use it to improve your coding dojos.
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Hank, Bram
Session Type: 90 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Materials: Public Repo and slides
What do you do when a workout becomes too easy? You add weights! But how do you do that with programming katas?

Incremental design is about stopping thinking of design as something set in stone, but instead starting thinking of it as a never-ending stream of small baby steps. Mastering coding in baby steps is the key to mastering incremental design. How do you teach coding in baby steps to experienced programmers who manage (mostly) to go through our katas in big steps?

TCR (Test && Commit || Revert) is the baby-step workout machine that you can add to your kata sessions! On top of teaching baby steps:

– It’s like a second coach, that constantly reminds participants to take baby steps

– It’s only a script, so it’s not as annoying as a human coach 😉

– Being an obvious ‘practice exercise’, it’s easier to sell than TDD katas!

– People say they enjoy the dash of ‘gamification’ it adds

– It teaches you how big a step you can take safely, this learning is actually easier to apply than TDD in legacy code!

– We’ve got a script, and it’s remote-friendly

Join this session, see and experiment TCR, and start coaching incremental design in your team NOW!

ℹ️ IMPORTANT PREPARATION NOTE:

To maximize practice time during the workshop, please prepare your development environment before joining. You can find the instructions in the repo’s README under the section “Running the kata using TCR”.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Back to program


max
14

Laptop

Build-Run-Improve-Repeat

A game about implementing and improving your DevOps cycle

Koen Vastmans
& Jord Rengerve

Imagine an organization working agile, but time to market is still too long. Management thinks DevOps can help, though. A CI/CD pipeline is what this organization needs, right? Can they really afford to do the wrong investments? Or should they prefer the safe environment of a simulation instead?

Build-Run-Improve-Repeat does exactly that: make you experience the impact of your investments and improvements on all the stages of the DevOps cycle, from plan, over test to monitor and back.

Intended audience: Jan Leo Bram Georges Vincent Hank Ellen
Session Type: 90 min experiential learning session
When talking about technical aspects of agile, DevOps is the next thing to focus on, bridging the gap between development and operations. Big tech companies wouldn’t be big tech companies without applying DevOps principles and practices. So what works for big tech companies, could also work for your organization, right? Which includes an automated CI/CD pipeline for faster delivery, right? If this is the direction your organization is going, that might not be the right choice to start with… But how do you avoid taking the wrong decisions? How can you experience the impact of your decisions in a safe environment? Well, then Build-Run-Improve-Repeat can help you. Build-Run-Improve-Repeat is a board game (only online for now) that revolves around the different stages of the DevOps cycle and their corresponding activities. It makes you decide how to invest in improving your way of working on all these stages and experience what happens if something goes wrong. And some things can really go wrong: what about bugs, security breaches, excessive load, performance issues, or system outages? And what can happen if your technical debt piles up because the teams absolutely need to deliver new features?

During this 90 minutes hands-on session you will get to know the gameplay of Build-Run-Improve-Repeat, experience what the impact of your decisions is and learn how you can get started yourself with this game in your own organization.

Not convinced yet? Then check out this video: https://youtu.be/cudbgA-hbnU

This is a hands-on session that lets you experience the game through the online platform Tabletopia.com. Participating will require a (free) account on Tabletopia.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Find your Energy

– Boost your quality of life

Per Beining

Is your life filled with an abundance of Energy? Always feeling your best? Always having energy through out the day, week and year, and never feeling down? Never wondering how others are keeping and replenishing their to-the-moon energy levels?

…if so – this session is probably not for you.

If you on the other side could use inspiration and a peek into my treasure chest of the Mindset, Tangible tools and Ninja tricks on the subject of Energy Management, I welcome your inside.

Expected experience: Knowledge of Miro would be nice….
Session Type: 90 min discovery session
Is your life filled with an abundance of Energy? Always feeling your best? Always having energy through out the day, week and year, and never feeling down? Never wondering how others are keeping and replenishing their to-the-moon energy levels?

…if so – this session is probably not for you.

If you on the other side could use inspiration and a peek into my treasure chest of the Mindset, Tangible tools and Ninja tricks on the subject of Energy Management, I welcome your inside.As highlighted in Chris Baileys keynote from Agile 2019 on “How to manage your attention in a world of distraction”: Productivity can be divided into 3 main areas: Time management, Energy management and managing your attention – or Focus management – as I think of it.

This session is a walk through of the Mindset, Tangible tools and Ninja tricks – I’ve come across, picked up, used, refined and guided others to take into consideration – in the area of Energy Management.

My hope for learning outcomes is that you leave the session inspired in regards to Energy Management. Perhaps even with a tiny shift in your mindset towards Energy Management. And – who knows – you could also have acquired a tool or two to add to your productivity treasure chest.

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max
16

Laptop

How to start up a distributed team online with gamification

Ben Linders

Remote first is becoming the norm for new teams, new distributed team have to be working online together from day one. Let’s explore tools and playing formats that can be used to start up distributed teams and foster further team development.
Goal of the session: Ideas for building stronger distributed teams
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
Remote first is becoming the norm, and this is also true for new teams. Where you would previously organize one or more onsite kick-off sessions to start a new team, a new distributed team would have to be working online together from day 1.

Techniques used for team chartering might still be useful, but they would need a different approach for online working. Gamification, incentifying people’s engagement by using game-style principles and practices, can help you to build strong teams.

In this session, we’ll look at several tools and playing formats that can be used to start up distributed teams and foster further development.

Back to program


10 things they didn’t tell you about TDD

Gil Zilberfeld

TDD (Test Driven Development) is a well-known practice, yet hardly implemented methodology of coding.

In the wild, you will barely see it fully implemented in organizations. Why is that? Is it because it is hard? Does it work only in special cases?

I’m here to tell you the things that so-called “introduction to TDD” books and articles don’t. It is the little things, like how TDD can be applied in the real world, with real code. How TDD principles apply, regardless of what your coding language is. And even, how it changes you as a programmer.

That’s right.

TDD changed my life, and it can help improve yours too. But to get on the road, you need to hear about the secrets of TDD. And I’m ready to tell you, from my experience and perspective.

This talk is for developers, obviously, but also for testers who want to promote better quality in their teams, by using developer-speak.

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Agile at scale generative principles, an alternative to scaled frameworks

Luca Minudel
& Giovanni Asproni

<<As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods.>> ~ Harrington Emerson
Goal of the session: Quit scaled frameworks, recipes for success, frameworks-by-the-book, and revisit the original spirit on Agility
Intended audience: everyone involved, experiencing, or considering scaling agile. change agents, agile practitioners, team members, managers, sr leaders, agile consultants, decision-makers.
Session Type: 60 min
This session introduces a pluralistic approach to achieving Agility at scale, that is inspired by principles. It is informed by the theory and empirical evidence, and it escapes the 1-framework by-the-book prison. The approach presented avoids the shortcomings and the missteps we all well know of the recipes-based copy-paste approaches that are common nowadays. And it actually works.

<<As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods.>> ~ Harrington Emerson

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
28

Colorful birds – that is all you need to build connected people!

Marie Jacqmin
& Jurgen Maus

The most awesome products are build by a group of intrinsic motivated people that share the same dream and that have learned to become the best possible team using their personal strengths.

Sounds nice? But how can we connect with people that seems to have completley other values?

In this session you will explore different personality styles, their strengths and weaknessess.

You will learn how to improve your collaboration with others and build stronger relationships.

Goal of the session: Although diversity makes teams stronger it is not always easy to work together. This session gives some insights on the behaviour of different people. How not understand and get empathy for each other. And how to make each other stronger.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hanke, Ellen
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
4 birds with some specific characteristics.

Eagle:”A disaster has happend, we will not make it in time, investigate this, do that, when will it be done, do you not see how urgent it is” No, no, no questions, I need to go…”

Owl:”We will give you a perfect analysis, we will start if we have everything under control, we will take all the time to be 100% sure, first the plan”

Parrots:”fantastic, such a big opportunity, lets go for it, I have a new idea, waauuw this is even a bigger opportunity, if we would do this and that it will be awesome, and we could also do this”

Pigeon:”……, don’t like them fighting, lets not change to much, they probably do not feel good about that, I should say something about it but then we will have more discussions, lets keep the peace, how can we help them”

Recognizable? How can they ever work together?

Still they have all potential to become the perfect team by using the strengths of all of them.

In this session you will learn the different personality styles, their strengths and weaknessess.

How to improve on you collaboration with others and build stronger relationships.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
24

Happy Imposter

How to use your imposter syndrome to become a better team coach

Remi-Armand Collaris
& Dionne Oomen

Perhaps you recognize this: You are in a job interview or coaching a team or hosting a workshop and a little voice in your head says things like:

  • why should they listen to me
  • what do I have to offer that others don’t
  • what if they find out I am not the expert they expect

If so, we just found out you are not that different from a lot of us. Now, how can you turn these ‘imposter’ feelings into an advantage in your daily work as a team member, coach, or leader? How can you reduce the pressure of having to know all the answers and at the same time be more inspirational? Well, come to our session and find out 🙂

Goal of the session: Learn how to use your own imposter feelings to make a difference
Intended audience: Everyone, not afraid to self-investigate
Expected experience: No special experience needed
Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
In this workshop, you learn how to use your imposter feelings to create more impact in your environment. We will share what the Imposter Syndrome entails. You will experience how common it is and find out some (positive and negative) consequences of the Imposter Syndrome.

We use the central part of the workshop to look at your imposter feelings from a different angle, to discover how you are, in a way, fooling yourself. After that, we investigate our own ability to empower teams, not despite, but perhaps even because of our Imposter Syndrome.

You will gather practical ideas on how to turn your imposter feelings into an advantage in your organization tomorrow.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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When working harder does not solve the problem anymore

working with knowledge workers in a complex environment

Jan De Baere

Knowledge work in the context of ever increasing complexity and speed of change. Organizations report me that they experience an ever increasing pressure to deliver, that the priorities keep changing and that people feel undervalued. They run around the whole day to move things and at the end of the day they are exhausted and realize that they still have to start doing the stuff they planned for that day. In our new context of increasing complexity just working harder is only going to make things worse. This talk is a visual simulation of work. You will see what causes this symptoms and above all what you can do about it. Work smarter not harder.

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The journey is more important than the destination

Agile Conversation Trigger (ACT): a serious game for teams that want to grow.

Huib Schoots
& Martijn van de Haterd

Session Type: 60 min experiential learning session
We have yet to find an Agile Maturity Model that we found useful in guiding a team in their growth. A bit more nuanced, in our experience most Agile Maturity Models are too descriptive in a ‘one size fits all’ format, they’re often too heavy to conduct them frequently and because of that they give too much importance to a state in the past. The outcomes are often misused by management to score maturity in a broader sense, most teams we’ve tried them with, didn’t feel the intrinsic motivation to use them as their own.

Sure, they can be inspiring or give good suggestions for a next step, but that’s what it is. Don’t make them too important. The value of “measuring” team maturity lies in the exploration that happens when we have conversations.

It doesn’t matter if a certain outcome is green, orange or red if the scan becomes just a score nobody uses. We much rather take it to the team and facilitate a conversation about maturity. ACT is a game / exercise that potentially touches all topics when it comes to agile maturity and team growth, but we don’t let the team rank anything. Instead, we let the team think about two aspects. What do we feel motivated to work on and what we think has most value to improve.

The second critical aspect is that they do not endlessly discuss each topic individually and get stuck in the semantics of it, no, because of the insane timebox and setup of the game all chosen items are discussed in regards to each other. Because once again, we don’t want utopian discussions on what something could be, we want real conversations that trigger realistic actions for growth the whole team can get behind.

In our session we will tell the story about how we developed this game. We will take you on the journey as to why we wanted to develop this game. The take away of our session will not be that you understand the exact rules of the game but that you understand the need of it. Oh and did we tell you that you can play the game for free with your team both online and in person?

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max
900

Reinventing the greatest invention of the last 120 years

Agile Coaches cannot reinvent what needs to be reinvented, now what?

Heitor Roriz Filho

Most Agile Coaches do not think of management as a technology. Like any technology it is subject to maturity and obsolescence and it reaches a plateau in its maturity lifecycle. Agile has been impacting management for many years now. We are at this very moment facing this plateau: what is going to happen to management and what is the role of Agile Coaches in this context?
Goal of the session: Understand that Agile Coaches need to go beyond Agile to orchestrate actual organizational transformations.
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Ellen, Joke, Vincent, Georges
Expected experience: Basics of Agile
Session Type: 60 min discovery session
Agile is the tip of the iceberg of a New Era in Management. Management is an invention and a technology. Like any tech it is subject to change following an S-curve. Guess what? We are way past its inflection point and right now the New Business Administration is being literally invented by practitioners around the world, just like 120 years ago when the foundations of mass production, task design and brand management were laid out by industry practitioners! I will cover in this talk what is being challenged in general management, how Agile worked as a spark plug for this whole process, what concepts are already in practice, and where we are heading. Simply put: I show the missing piece of the puzzle that EVERY change agent aka Agile Coach MUST know in order to truly succeed in transformation projects. Even if you don’t have a management background. Welcome to the New Era in Management.
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Learning to run it

Our journey to unlock the benefits of Agile and DevOps

Nelis Boucké

Experience report of how we learned to run it by using techniques from Agile and DevOps, leading to 30% improvement in business outcome.
Goal of the session: Inspiration from an experience report
Session Type: short experience report (30 min)
Adopting Agile or DevOps should lead to an improved ability to deliver valuable and working software to customers. But despite all the knowledge and techniques available, it remains surprisingly difficult to unlock these benefits in large enterprises.

We will share our journey to unlock the benefits of Agile and DevOps in the context of both iOS and Android applications in a large bank, navigating a road full of bumps and potholes. We had to master walking (tech capabilities like TDD, quality focus, and mindset of continuous learning through pairing and Mobbing). We had to learn to jog an obstacle course (navigate and adapt the release processes around the team). And we had to learn to run (deeply understand what our customers need).

It was and is a challenging journey, but the results are nothing less than spectacular. We reduced the number of quality issues by more than 85% and managed a factor of 10 improvements on reducing the lead-time and increased the deployment frequency. The business results improved by 30% already, in terms of increased customer happiness and an increase in customer interactions.

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Learn to use technical debt in your benefit

Use technical debt for speed on short term, without slowing you down in the long run. A story and a game.

Arjen de Ruiter

Technical debt is not bad. If managed well, you can get value from it. You need to get your team and stakeholders think of when to create and when to pay debt. In this session you’ll learn how

https://github.com/arjenderuiter/techdebtgame

Intended audience: Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: You should have done a few projects or worked on a few products
Session Type: 30 min experiential learning session
Materials: I’ll share the github link when we (me and me designer) have published it. I can share it upfront in a Zoom call if you want.
In software development, technical debt is the cost of rework you need to do, in order to keep a system functional in the long run.

It could either be the result of taking shortcuts, which pile up code that you need to come back to later; or, it could also be the result of changing requirements – for example, you have more users than you expected, and now you have performance issues.

However, even though technical debt is often seen as negative, it not always a bad thing: The shortcuts you take now might speed up your development, and give you a first-mover advantage.

Like with financial debt, technical debt can create leverage – but only if you balance acquiring debt with paying debt, and only if you make conscious decisions about your debt. Having both too much, and too little technical debt can slow you down!

For example, not having any technical debt probably means that you’re over engineering or doing premature optimisation, slowing down how quickly you ship new features. Similarly, too much technical debt results in stability issues, reduces your speed of delivery, and means you have a lot of code to rework later on.

I have created a game to make it easy for engineers to discuss this topic with stakeholders. This game aims to help you understand how to leverage technical debt to your benefit, so you build a successful business. You’ll also learn that too much technical debt might give you success in the short term, but makes you loose in the long term. You need to figure out how to strike a balance! 🙂

After the presentation, the game will be explained and it can be download from github where it is available under a creative commons licence. By the time of the XP Days event, there will be a web page as well.

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
100

Living Documentation: Why should I care?

Kaspar van Dam

Living Documentation. In this session you will discover what it is and why you should care. You’ll be introduced to different work forms and how to implement Living Documentation into your Way of Working without it becoming a formal process or going back to the old times of comprehensive documentation.
Goal of the session: Be inspired and know some hands-on techniques to start using Living Documentation tomorrow.
Intended audience: Everyone involved in making software from designer, to programmer and from tester to product owner
Expected experience: Understanding of the Agile mindset.
Session Type: 30 min discovery session
Materials: n/a
Living Documentation: What is it and why should you care? A long, long time ago most people in IT had put their faith in something called the V-Model. It was about extensive documentation first, building software later and finally testing the whole monolith. Most IT-projects failed. Along came Agile that stated (among other things) that we (should) value working software over comprehensive documentation. It was a real game changer and nowadays most IT-projects work according to those Agile principles. For most organisations that meant throwing all documentation out of the window and just start building software. It was definitely more fun to do, but at the end of the road the tests turned out to be the only ‘documentation’ of the newly build software. And again quite frequently IT-projects failed because while we did create software that was built right, we did unfortunately not build the right software… And that’s where Living Documentation kicks in. It’s about an Agile way of documenting your software. It’s a step back towards the V-Model/Waterfall model and it’s not just about building the software right, but also about building the right software. In this talk I’d like to share what Living Documentation is, how it can help create software an end-user really cares about and also how to make this work in the real world using CARE: ‘Capturing Agile Requirements by Example’.
Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding. He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Switching from Scrum to Kanban? Forget it!

Denis Salnikov

“Let’s switch to Kanban – it fits us better than Scrum!” – have you ever heard something like that? I did many times. And it rarely led to any significant improvement in any dimension you may think of. Why so? And is there a way to make Scrum and Kanban work together instead of replacing one with another?

In my talk, I will answer both questions and support my opinion with multiple examples from my practice.

Goal of the session: Understand why “switching” is not an option and learn some useful Kanban tools & practices useful for Scrum teams.
Intended audience: Marieke, Bram, Ellen
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
“Let’s switch to Kanban – it fits us better than Scrum!” – have you ever heard something like that? I did many times. And it rarely led to any significant improvement in any dimension you may think of. Why so? And is there a way to make Scrum and Kanban work together instead of replacing one with another?

In my talk, I will answer both questions and support my opinion with multiple examples from my practice.

Key takeaways you can expect to receive:

1. “Switching” is not an option – start with what you do now

2. Your perception of Kanban may be wrong

3. Even if you decide to “switch”, you should do it in an evolutionary way

4. Kanban practices recommended being applied in Scrum Teams

5. The way to ensure predictability and solve the puzzle of estimation with Kanban practices

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Philippe Vandessel

Philippe Vandessel

Website: http://www.ilean.be

In 2015 Philippe participated in a Scrum team. This way of working was such a revelation and in the same time also a coming home. Finally all the pieces of the puzzle fell together. From that point on scrum and anything agile was the only way forward for Philippe.

Since that time, Philippe has helped several teams in adopting Scrum step by step by facilitating a culture founded on collaboration, trust and continuous improvement.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/philippe-vandessel-9643882/


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Geneviève Loriaux

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Geneviève first got in contact with agile thinking when her husband started to create DevOp teams at his company some years ago. While working as a PM in the construction industry, she always has been looking for ways to improve collaboration in a very old-fashioned environment (<– big judgement here). In the journey to attempt to comprehend why the environment wasn’t receptive for these ‘ideal’ change opportunities, she learned more about Agile, Coaching and Non Violent Communication and it changed her life. It was time to quit the construction industry and master the Agile Methodologies and build an expertise in the things she became passionate about.

Genevièves’ higher purpose is to support others to be able to shine and thrive. She found that agile ways of working and open feedback can make a big difference for the teams she has been working with. For the teams she’s leading, she tries to be the leader she once needed.

www.linkedin.com/in/genevieveloriaux


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Robert van Lieshout

Robert van Lieshout

Website: https://www.pragmaticall.nl

Twitter: @robertvl

Robert is a compassionate agilist, coach and facilitator. With over 30 years of experience, he still has a lot to learn. His love for happy people and high standards have led him in many directions. As a result you can find him coaching individuals and teams, facilitating groups, as well as promoting BDD, TDD and pair programming.

A good way to get Robert started is to offer him a beer or a board game.


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Wiro van Schaik

Wiro van Schaik

Website: https://trailblazers.nl

Currently, I’m realising my Ikigai with Trailblazers B.V., a supplier of professional Java and Web developers, Scrum Master, Agile coaches and related experts, based on Agile and Sociocratic principles.

Until recently, I delivered Scrum trainings via KnowledgeHut, worked on Blockchain project with The Enable Group, organised a Sociocracy 3.0 training together with Part-up.com, Nieuworganiseren.nu and ThriveInCollaboration.com and tried to setup A-teams as a supplier of ready-to-go high performing software delivery teams.

Throughout my career, I specialised in the fine art of software development, helping organisations like De Nederlandse Bank (Dutch National Bank), ANWB, iProfs, Clockwork/Ordina, AiA and several of their clients implementing Agile based project methodologies. I trained many people in Scrum both in public and in-house workshops and coached many project teams to become more succesfull by adapting Scrum and other Agile & Lean best practices.


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Linda van der Pal

Linda van der Pal

Twitter: @DuchessFounder

Linda is a developer at Trailblazers, the founder of Duchess, Java Champion, and agile enthusiast. You can often find her at conferences either as a speaker or organizing something that she thinks might increase the diversity. She has been a Java developer for several companies since 2002.


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Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Frederik Vannieuwenhuyse

Website: http://value-first.be

Twitter: vfrederik

Coach, facilitator, educator

I work at iLean: http://www.ilean.be

If you want to know more about my background, studies, certifications, experiences, interests … connect with me on http://linkedin.com/in/frederikvannieuwenhuyse/ and my professional activities, check https://value-first.be/

Happy to listen to you and reflect! How can I help you today?

Frederik is also XP Days Benelux co-organizer and event organizer at the Agile Belgium meetup.


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Shane Hastie

Website: https://www.infoq.com/profile/shane-hastie/

Twitter: @shanehastie

Shane joined ICAgile in 2017 as the Director of Agile Learning Programs and is now the Director of Community Development. He contributes to the strategic direction and expansion of ICAgile’s learning programs, including maintaining and extending ICAgile’s learning objectives, providing thought leadership, collaborating with industry experts, and supporting the larger ICAgile community, which includes more than 150 Member Organizations and over 100,000 ICAgile certification holders. In the Community Development role, he is responsible for building and nurturing the community of over 500 ICAgile Authorized Instructors.

Shane is a TBR certified Trainer for both the in-person and virtual versions of the course and is authorized to teach the Facilitating Exceptional Remote Learning class from Judy Rees.

Over the last 30+ years Shane has been a practitioner and leader of developers, testers, trainers, project managers and business analysts, helping teams to deliver results that align with overall business objectives. Before joining ICAgile he spent 15 years as a professional trainer, coach and consultant specialising in Agile practices, business analysis, project management, requirements, testing and methodologies for SoftEd in Australia, New Zealand and around the world.

He has worked with large and small organisations, from individual teams to large transformations all around the world. He draws on over 30 years of practical experience across all levels of Information Technology and software intensive product development.

Shane was a director of the Agile Alliance from 2011 to 2016 and was the founding Chair of Agile Alliance New Zealand.

He leads the Culture and Methods editorial team for InfoQ.com where he hosts the weekly InfoQ Culture Podcast.

He was one of the authors for both versions of the Agile Extension to the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge and a member of the core team for BABOK V3.

He is co-chair of the Agile Alliance Agile Coaching Ethics initiative, working to produce a code of ethical conduct for agile coaching.

He is co-author of the recent book #noprojects – A Culture of Continuous Value, available on Amazon and from InfoQ

“I firmly believe that humanistic way of working and the agile mindset are desperately needed in organisations all around the globe today. Taking agile values and principles beyond software is important and making sure they are properly embedded is absolutely crucial for success – we’re in an industry that touches every aspect of people’s lives and massively influences society as a whole and I want to be a part of making sure that industry is both ethical and sustainable.”


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Johan Decoster

Website: http://www.growthlab21.com


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Philippe Bourgau

Philippe Bourgau

Website: http://philippe.bourgau.net

Twitter: @pbourgau

Continuous Refactoring Coach

Life is too short for boring stuff! I help software engineers to reach a productive and sustainable pace through continuous refactoring of their code and organization.


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damien.menanteau@murex.com


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Koen Vastmans

Koen Vastmans

Website: https://www.simu-learn.net

Twitter: @Koen_V

I’ve been working in IT for 25+ years. After many years of development, I moved to agile coaching and training which I did for about 6 years. But wanting to be more involved in technical stuff again, I switched to DevOps processes. Even though I am no full time coach anymore, I still share my experiences often in workshops and trainings. Once agile coach, always agile coach?

My passion for learning new things and sharing what I learnt is my main driver.


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Jord Rengerve

Jord Rengerve

Website: http://peopleblendit.com

Twitter: @JorddeRengerve

Jord Rengerve is a freelancer Agile Coach. He worked as IT developer for 10 years and as Program manager for another 10 years. He worked in large international companies (Syntegra, Amadeus) and in public administration (currently as a consultant in European commission). As a coach, he promotes a best of breed approach of traditional project management and Agile. He trusts that no organisation can exist without both. He is a big fan of board games and values the benefits of serious games to deliver knowledge in a fun way during workshops he organises on Meetup and for his customers.


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Per Beining

Per Beining

Twitter: @perbeining

Per is a well experienced freelancer within the field of Agilily. Currently in his own company called XPand (www.xpand.dk).

Per’s key skills are Agile project leadership and mentoring in IT environments. Working together with developers, business sponsors and management, he helps organizations implement Agile while considering existing culture, processes and governance (including PMO), and the organization’s Agile maturity.

Educating and training people and organisations in how to apply Agile and Scrum is also close to his heart. And how to create and work with requirements is one of his current main focus areas.

Per is a DSDM Certified APL Practitioner and Certified Scrum Master and Product Owner. He has many years experience using traditional approaches to project management and systems development, and is a Certified Prince2 Practitioner, Certified IPMA Level C project leader, and Certified ITIL Foundation Level practitioner.

Per is a trained coach within ORSC – Organisational Relationship Systems coaching, Co-Active coaching and a Lifebook leader.

Per started his career as a software developer (perl, java and HTML). He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Copenhagen Business School, and has solid experience in telecommunications, media, transportation & logistics, finance/banking, and the military.

Write to Per at per@xpand.dk or call +45 40 308 307.


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Ben Linders

Ben Linders

Website: https://www.benlinders.com

Twitter: @BenLinders

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality and Continuous Improvement, based in The Netherlands. Author of Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives, Waardevolle Agile Retrospectives, What Drives Quality, The Agile Self-assessment Game and Continuous Improvement. Creator of the Agile Self-assessment Game.

As an adviser, coach, and trainer he helps organizations by deploying effective software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers.

Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean and Quality, and a frequent speaker and writer. He shares his experience in a bilingual blog (Dutch and English), as an editor for Culture and Methods at InfoQ and as an expert in communities like Computable, Quora, DZone, and TechTarget. Follow him on Twitter: @BenLinders.


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Gil Zilberfeld

Gil Zilberfeld

Website: http://www.everydayunittesting.com/

Twitter: @gil_zilberfeld

Gil Zilberfeld (TestinGil) has been in software since childhood, writing BASIC programs on his trusty Sinclair ZX81. With more than 25 years of developing commercial software, he has vast experience in software methodology and practices.

Gil has been teaching and applying modern development and testing principles more than a decade. From automated testing to exploratory testing, testing methodology, unit and integration testing, clean code and testability – he’s done it all. He is still learning from his successes and failures.

Gil speaks frequently in international conferences about unit testing, TDD, testing in general and design practices. He is the author of “Everyday Unit Testing” and “Everyday Spring Testing”, blogs and post videos, co-organizer of the Agile Practitioners conference and in his spare time he shoots zombies, for fun.


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Luca Minudel

Luca Minudel

Website: http://www.smharter.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmHarterLtd

Luca Minudel is a Lean-Agile Coach & Trainer, Transformation lead, Author and speaker, with over 20 years of experience in professional software delivery and digital product development, most of them with Lean and Agile.

He is passionate about agility, lean, complexity science, and co-creation.

He contributed to the adoption of lean and agile practices by Ferrari’s F1 racing team. For ThoughtWorks, he delivered training, coaching, assessments and organisational transformations in top-tier organisations in UK, Europe and the United States. He worked as Head of Agility, Agile Transformation Lead, Lean/Agile Practice Lead, and as Lean/Agile Coach in companies such as HSBC, Lloyds, LexisNexis.

Luca is the founder and CEO at SmHarter.com, a company that helps organisations turn their way of working into their competitive advantage.


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Giovanni Asproni

Website: https://launchventures.co

Twitter: @gasproni

After several years as an independent consultant—and as a permanent employee—spent helping companies and teams to become more effective at producing and delivering high quality software, I’ve become co-founder and CTO at Launch Ventures https://launchventures.co.

My expertise ranges from software design and programming to software project management, and agile software development. I am a frequent conference speaker, and organiser.

I have contributed two chapters to the book ’97 Things Every Programmer Should Know’ published by O’Reilly.


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Marie Jacqmin

Marie Jacqmin

Website: http://www.adjugo.com

Hello, my name is Marie,

I had been working for a while in agility and using scrum without naming it… when I was introduced to the movement by Chris and Karen @ Adjugo.

Got totally taken by the virus and had the chance to follow various amazing trainings, now looking forward to sharing visions and experiences on the matter. For me it’s about having fun and finding the right flow in your work, make ‘priority’ sound funky, getting things done the right way, everybody feeling at the right place.

On the side, I’m also taking care of the drawings for our sessions, that’s fun!


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Jurgen Maus

Jurgen Maus

Website: https://www.barco.com/

I’m proud to say I’m still growing as Scrum master & Agile coach.

8 years ago I was reborn as a servant person.

Dreaming of energized teams that are able to grow to their potential.

8 years of growing myself, removing the boundaries I put on the teams, giving them the environment to grow.

Growing towards organisational coaching. Growing towards trainer.

Keeping the fundaments of caring, positivism, autonomy, connection.


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Remi-Armand Collaris

Remi-Armand Collaris

Website: https://oconnectivepartners.pro

Twitter: @racollaris

I believe an organization’s success is closely linked to the space employees experience to develop their talents and make a real collaborative difference. Using Agile, Scrum, and Lean thinking and practices, I design and discover new and better ways to get people to collaborate more effectively.

My experience is that it takes just a few days a month to really get a team going in taking ownership of improving their way of working as part of their job. This kind of autonomy makes for more fun and engagement in the workplace (and more astonishing results as a by-product).


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Dionne Oomen

Website: http://www.hummingbird.coach

Jaren geleden werd ik als developer gegrepen door het agile gedachtegoed en de grote impact die het had op mijn werkplezier en onze teamresultaten. Elke week probeerden we nog iets meer voor de klant te realiseren en dat gaf een kick. In alle rollen (scrum master, agile transformatie coach, product owner) die ik daarna in organisaties heb vervuld is mijn doel geweest om die energie in teams te ontlokken. ‘Ontlokken’, want ik ben ervan overtuigd dat die energie in de mens zit en alleen de juiste randvoorwaarden nodig zijn om teams te laten vliegen: Verantwoordelijkheid, vertrouwen en visie. Ik heb ervaren dat door het stellen van de juiste vragen, medewerkers en leidinggevenden vanuit zichzelf een verandering doormaken. In mijn optiek is dat de enige manier om mensen en teams duurzaam te laten groeien.


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Jan De Baere

Jan De Baere

In order to deal with and even thrive on the ever increasing speed and complexity we need to collaborate, organize and think in another way. Acknowledging that hand labor and knowledge work behaves fundamentally different.

The bottom-up approach of agile is morphing into to cultural transformations where the whole company and all the aspects are changing. Coaching organization’s on this journey is what I do.

My specialization is on enterprise/business agility, portfolio and organizational structures.

Going from static to dynamic organizations.


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Huib Schoots

Huib Schoots

Website: https://www.huibschoots.nl

Twitter: @huibschoots

Huib Schoots has over 25 years of experience in IT. His personal mission is shaping better people and software quality by connecting, innovating, facilitating, coaching, enabling, and teaching. He is fascinated by mindset, thinking, behavior, and collaboration. He is active in many communities.

He is a humanist, servant leader, open, direct, creative, idea generator, result-driven, humor, problem solver, curious, confronting, critical thinker, passionate and energetic, lifelong learner, entrepreneurial, analytic, and continuous (world) improver. He likes hanging out with friends, playing trombone in a brass band, board & computer games, LEGO, photography, running, beer brewing, magic tricks, traveling, and reading. He works as an Operational Director & Quality Coach @qualityaccelerators, Agile Test Expert @deagiletesters.nl, organizer @ frogsconf & ministry of testing. He is also one of five Rapid Software Testing Instructors.


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Martijn van de Haterd

Martijn van de Haterd

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/martijnvandehaterd/

Martijn works as an Agile consultant for Improve Quality Services. He believes a team’s predictability comes from a place of professional and personal safety. His main focus is creating an environment where openness, ownership and purpose are key. Both on team level and organizational level.


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Heitor Roriz Filho

Heitor Roriz Filho

Website: http://www.massimus.com

Twitter: @hroriz

I currently work as an Agile Coach and Trainer worldwide, based in São Paulo. I write articles, e-books, and speak in conferences when my avilability allows. I have been working with Agile since late 2004 and in addition to speaking at Agile/Scrum, Lean Six Sigma and PMI conferences, I am the founder of several Scrum user groups on FB as well as discussion lists. Since Jan 2011 I work as a Certified Scrum Trainer at Massimus (http://www.massimus.com) a company with a single mission: help shape people and corporations for the XXI century. I hold a M.Sc. in Information Technology from the University of Stuttgart, Germany. In the last 20+ years have worked and gathered experience in companies like Yamaha Motor Company, Itautec-Philco SA, DaimlerChrysler AG, Fraunhofer Institut, FPF (Fundação Paulo Feitoza), among others. I have hands on experience working for 3 years as a ScrumMaster and Product Owner for FPF and Siemens-Mobile where I also coached teams to implement and improve Scrum in constructing products. During 2+ years I worked as Information Manager for the local government at an Institute of Urban Planning where I applied Scrum outside of software (back in 2009), in architectural and building projects. I participated as a research assistant in projects funded by project LBA (Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia) at INPA (http://www.inpa.br) in cooperation with JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) and NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Agency). Since 2011 I have coached from small to Fortune 100 enterprises in Brazil, Europe and USA and so far have trained over 5,000 professionals. I am also a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu purple belt, so don’t mess with me.


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Nelis Boucké

Nelis Boucké

Twitter: @nelisboucke

Software crafter with a profound interest in defining environments where teams can thrive to build great product.

  • Experience with agile transformations, software architecture and technical excellence in both SME and corporate settings.
  • Focus on delivering results. Agile in itself is not a goal, but Agile principles help to deliver value in rapidly changing environments.
  • Experiences in assessing and setting up technical excellence to deliver quality products.
  • Worked with companies in the following domains: energy, logistics and automation, automated warehouse systems, tank terminals, public transport, municipalities and government administration, security, banking.


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Arjen de Ruiter

Website: http://www.arjenderuiter.nl

I am an experienced engineering leader. My expertise is in software development, architecture, infrastructure and operations. Currently I work as VP Engineering at Sendcloud. In the past I have helped several e-commerce and SaaS companies increase software delivery performance. I do so by improving organisation and team structure, modernising architecture and moving into agile and DevOps ways of working.


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Kaspar van Dam

Kaspar van Dam

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kvandam/

Kaspar van Dam has been working in IT for well over 15 years now. He started as a software tester and soon specialised in test automation and agile testing. Around 8 years ago he was one of the first people in the Netherlands to adopt Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) as a new way of working. Learning what it was from people like Dan North and Gojko Adzic he started introducing BDD at numerous organisations and became a leading consultant on BDD and introduced CARE: Capturing Agile Requirements by Example where the vision behind BDD is combined with practical techniques to implement it. He has spoken on this topic on different (international) conferences and published a large number of articles on BDD in various trade magazines.


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Denis Salnikov

Denis Salnikov

Website: http://agileexpat.tilda.ws/en/

Twitter: @agile_expat

Denis Salnikov is a certified Scrum Master, Kanban Coach & Agile Coach actively consulting, coaching, mentoring, and teaching cross-functional development teams, companies management, and organisations since 2014.

Denis has led and taken an active part in several agile transformations initiated from scratch, working with both development teams and management, helping to establish and foster an agile mindset, self-organization and product ownership. He has supported several companies across Europe and US in their LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) framework adoptions. His scaling experience also includes Nexus framework and “Spotify model”.

He actively contributes to the Software Development and Agile communities speaking at conferences, taking part in podcasts and writing in his Medium blog. Denis is also the founder of Agile Kuban (Krasnodar, RU) community.


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Participants

Jan
Jan
Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That’s where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke
Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought “well, let’s give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it”. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it’s an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram
Bram has never missed an XP Days. He has been to several other conferences in Europe, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes the XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn’t know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn’t really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he’s relaxed, who knows what could happen? –Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges
Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he’s chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can’t be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they….?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don’t do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don’t fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants… He’s heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with “agile” methods, so he comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what “agile” can offer him. He doesn’t know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well… What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user’s lives. That’s one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this “agile” stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen
Ellen is an agile coach. She’s been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean… it doesn’t matter much to her. She’s more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions